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Showing posts from September, 2015

Jean McHale on The Global Beauty Industry, Consumers, Regulation and Accountability

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In this post, Jean McHale discusses some of the legal and regulatory challenges posed by the globalisation of the beauty industry. Jean is Professor of Health Care Law at Birmingham Law School and Co-Investigator of the Beauty Demands project.





The globalisation of the beauty industry gives rise to some fundamental regulatory challenges. Individuals seeking beauty procedures such as face lifts, liposuction and even cosmetic dentistry are increasingly likely to travel to seek such procedures as illustrated by the growth of the cosmetic surgery “holiday” market.  As many of these procedures lie outside the control exercised by the clinicians in a standard therapeutic context, whether through a National Health Service or standard Health Insurance schemes, the consumer has far greater autonomy in relation to choice of procedure, timing and provider. The scale and the nature of effective regulation of safety of beauty products and procedures is problematic. Globalisation of procedures may in…

Francesca Minerva on the Homogenisation & Globalisation of Beauty Norms

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In the second of a series of blog posts anticipating our third project workshop on 'the globalisation of beauty', Francesca Minerva responds to the question of whether dominant beauty norms are becoming increasingly homogenised, and considers some of the ethical issues arising from this shift.








Is it still the case that there are significant cultural differences in dominant beauty norms and ideals or are beauty norms becoming increasingly homogenised and global?

What humans consider beautiful is partly determined by evolution and partly by cultural influences. For instance, symmetry is universally considered beautiful for complex evolutionary reasons, and therefore we are "hard-wired" to find symmetry attractive. In this sense, some features of beauty (symmetry, some proportions in the human body etc) have always been considered attractive and probably will always be. In this sense, some features of beauty have always been "homogenised and global". On the oth…

Andrew Edgar on the homogenisation of beauty in sport

In anticipation of our third workshop on 'the globalisation of beauty', we asked our speakers and participants to consider whether conceptions of beauty are becoming more global. Here Andrew Edgar, lecturer in philosophy at the University of Cardiff, addresses this question from his own specialism in the philosophy of sport.

Question: Is it still the case that there are significant cultural differences in dominant beauty norms and ideals or are beauty norms becoming increasingly homogenised and global? If so what are the drivers of this? Is it a westernised norm? Are there key ethical, legal or practices issues which arise in this context?
Addressing this question from my own specialism of the philosophy of sport, I would suggest that there is an identifiable process of homogenisation in the shaping of the ideal athletic body.Over thesecond half of the twentieth century and early twenty-first, the muscle definition of both the male and female athlete's body, across many spor…

Are beauty norms becoming increasingly global?

In anticipation of our third workshop on 'the globalisation of beauty', we asked our speakers and participants to consider whether conceptions of beauty are indeed becoming more global. If you would like to contribute on this topic and write a post for us please email Ruth Wareham. We welcome contributions from different disciplines and perspectives.

Question for Consideration: Is it still the case that there are significant cultural differences in dominant beauty norms and ideals or are beauty norms becoming increasingly homogenised and global? If so what are the drivers of this? Is it a westernised norm? Are there key ethical, legal or practices issues which arise in this context?